Opinion Propaganda Insight

Counter Daesh Insight Bulletin 4 – 10 June

This summary includes notable items of Daesh propaganda from the previous week, including a focus on Afghanistan. It is intended as a quick overview for those who do not have time to follow monitoring services on a daily basis and is not a comprehensive listing of every piece of Daesh propaganda released. Daesh often make fictitious claims which should not be taken as fact.

Overview

Daesh claimed attacks in Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya, Pakistan, Somalia and Syria. There was very little output from core Daesh channels, beyond the usual Al-Naba newspaper, which featured an article about the holy month of Ramadan in West Africa and another announcing the death of one of its contributors. Amaq released a 10 second video of the murder of a Somali policeman.

Output from unofficial Daesh brands included the report of the death of an Australian fighter. Supporters spread posters on Telegram predicting attacks during the World Cup in Russia and of the US president as a prisoner. In one President Trump was portrayed as having been beheaded. A pro-Daesh group promotes One Card, iTunes and Google Play cards as a way to fund the group’s fighters.

A pro-Daesh magazine named an-Anfal included an editorial demanding action from Muslims all over the world, with advice on giving financial support to Daesh, attacking with poison and online security. A new media group calling itself Atlas News Agency and claiming to be independent, published Daesh news in Arabic and French on social media, avoiding jihadist language, likely in an attempt to avoid being taken down.

Daesh activities in Afghanistan

In the last two months, Daesh’s branch in Afghanistan, which it calls ‘Khorasan Province’ has claimed an increasing number of attacks, including at the home of an Afghan parliamentarian and on a polling centre. Elections are to be held in October. Daesh has threatened more attacks on Afghan officials via their local radio channel ‘Voice of the Caliphate’.

It claimed the bombing of a gathering of academics in Kabul. It has also threatened girls’ schools in Nangahar, stating that all schools are a target for attacks. It has claimed that the threat is a response to US airstrikes in the region. A Daesh commentator, Sultan Aziz Ezam, said that the threat against the school aims to ‘eliminate’ secular education and that Daesh is not against women’s education as long as it is line with Sharia and taught by women.


See previous editions of the insight bulletin here